Malampaya Sound Tagbanua

Taytay, Palawan

There are only about 6,000 Irrawaddy dolphins worldwide and it has been listed as "critically endangered" by the IUCN. Because of the Malampaya Sound's biodiversity, commercial and local fisherman have been attracted to the area and the sound is showing the impact of overfishing. The Tagbanua fishermen in New Guinlo, Taytay, use specific moon and tide schedules and selective harvesting, regardless ...

of market demands, to avoid overfishing and impacting the Irrawaddy dolphin.

Malampaya Sound Tagbanua News

  • Endangered Napoleon Wrasse Spotted After Half A Decade In Palawan

    Endangered Napoleon Wrasse Spotted After Half A Decade In Palawan

    The Napoleon wrasse is a known gentle giant creature distinguished by interesting patterns on its scales. It has hump over the head like a Napoleon's hat, which further protrudes as they age. No wonder it is one of the favorite fishes for divers to encounter across the world. Its meat is one of the most expensive luxury foods in the Southeast Asia.

    The divers group Dive The World reported that the Napoleon wrasse is valued around USD 100 per kilogram in restaurants in Hong Kong. As the number of Napoleon wrasse decreases at a fast and alarming rate, its price inevitably increases. The fish ...

  • Palawan Conservation Agreements Signed Renewed

    Palawan Conservation Agreements Signed Renewed

    Malampaya Foundation recently renewed conservation agreements (CA's) and signed two new covenants to continue its conservation work and commitments in the municipalities of Linapacan and Taytay, Palawan.

    CA's renewed in Linapacan were with: Tarabidan Y Ang Mairentek Na Manegpangisda sa Barangay San Miguel and Narunutan Y ang Manegbila na Tagbanua Tong Barangay Pical. While in the municipality of Taytay, renewal was conducted with the Malampaya Sound Protected Seascape and Landscape (MSPLS) Protected Area Management Board (PAMB) and Samahan ng mga Nagkakaisa sa Kaunlara ng Bgy Tumbod.

    New ...

  • The Tagbanuas Of Palawan Are Models Of Environment Protection

    The Tagbanuas Of Palawan Are Models Of Environment Protection

    The Tagbanua tribe of northern Palawan is known for keeping their forests, rivers and coasts in an almost pristine state for thousands of years.

    While struggling to survive amidst the rapidly changing times, the Tagbanuas have shown the world how people can steward nature without destroying it.

    It is for this reason that Filipino conservationist Dr. Raoul Cola wrote a book that chronicles the indigenous conservation strategies of Tagbanuas, particularly in the Malampaya Sound protected area.

    "Conservation has multifaceted aims??"one of which is to respect and preserve the cultural kno ...

  • Discover The Indigenous Conservation Strategies Of The Tagbanuas Through Dr Raoul Colas Latest Book

    World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Philippines launches the book entitled The Tagbanua of Malampaya Sound: Conserving Nature As Lifeways which was authored by Dr. Raoul Cola a veteran conservationist that tackles on the indigenous conservation strategies of the Tagbanuas in Palawan. They were one of the oldest tribes in the Philippines where mainly found in the Malampaya Sound in northern and central Palawan which according to research that they are possible descendants of the Tabon Man which refers to the fossilized anatomically modern human remains discovered by Dr. Robert B. Fox in the island ...

  • Book On Tagbanua Environment Protection Strategies Launched

    The Tagbanua, the indigenous people of Malampaya Sound in Northern Palawan -- have kept their forests, rivers and coasts in an almost pristine state for thousands of years. While struggling to survive amidst the rapidly-changing times, the Tagbanua have shown the world how people can steward nature without destroying it.

    "Conservation has multifaceted aims -- one of which is to respect and preserve the cultural knowledge of indigenous peoples," Mr. Cola said in a statement. "For all projects within indigenous peoples' territories, WWF always exerts great effort to understand their culture ...

  • Tribe Shows Way To Save Rare Dolphins

    Tribe Shows Way To Save Rare Dolphins

    The Tagbanua people may be obscure and small, but their indigenous practices could pull Irrawaddy dolphins in Malampaya Sound in Palawan back from the brink of extinction.

    Over the years, destructive fishing practices have depleted the population of Irrawaddy dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) in the waters of northwest Palawan, according to a study by the Philippine chapter of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).

    The population of the marine mammals in Malampaya Sound, one of two areas in the country where they are found, has plummeted to 42 from 77 in 2001, according to the environmenta ...