LAMAVE

National

Physalus is a non-profit organization operating primarily for the protection of the environment through marine conservation initiatives. In 2010, Physalus started the Large Marine Vertebrates Project Philippines (LAMAVE) to conduct scientific research and raise environmental awareness in collaboration with government agencies, non-government organizations, universities and the private sector.

Large Marine Vertebrate Project Philippines LAMAVE News

  • Every Turtle Counts. Rescue And Release

    Every Turtle Counts. Rescue And Release

    A green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) was released to the Bohol Sea on the 23rd of January after it was found floating in the waters of Zamboanguita, Negros Oriental in the third week of September. The turtle was released by LAMAVE Researcher and Vet Dr Alessandro Ponzo in collaboration with Silliman University Institute of Environmental & Marine Sciences (IEMS), Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) and Marine Conservation Philippines (MCP).

    The Philippines is home to green sea turtles, which play an important role in marine ecosystems by maintaining healthy seagrass beds an ...

  • New Study Reveals The Global Biology Of Whale Sharks

    New Study Reveals The Global Biology Of Whale Sharks

    A new study explores how citizen science has contributed to our understanding of the basic biology and ecology of the whale shark on a global scale.

    The publication: 'Undersea Constellations: The Global Biology of an Endangered Marine Megavertebrate Further Informed through Citizen Science', led by Dr Brad Norman, was a collaborative effort of 38 scientists, including LAMAVE Executive Directors Dr Alessandro Ponzo and Gonzalo Araujo, as well as David David and Elson Aca from WWF-Philippines.

    What is Citizen Science and how can it help us study whale sharks?

    Citizen science is the coll ...

  • Rarely Seen Shark Spotted By Paul Allens RV Petrel

    While exploring a World War II ship wreckage in Philippines earlier this month, crew members of Paul Allens research vessel (R/V) Petrel were caught by surprise when they spotted a large shark swimming out of the darkness. Using cameras on their remotely operated submersible vehicle, her crew zoomed in to catch a better look and were able to identified the species a bluntnose sixgill shark.

    Reaching up to 15 feet long, the bluntnose sixgill shark (Hexanchus griseus) is one of the largest sharks in the world, but uncommon in the area. Reflecting primitive characteristics from the Triassic pe ...

  • Londoner Leads Marine-life Conservation For PHL Seas

    Londoner Leads Marine-life Conservation For PHL Seas

    It is quite ironic how a girl surnamed "Snow" can be found chasing sharks, whale sharks and rays in the tropical islands of the Philippines for a living.

    Sally J. Snow is the executive director of Lamave, one of the fastest-growing non-governmental organizations (NGOs), which have been successfully documenting the Philippines?s ocean wildlife specializing in large marine vertebrates for close to seven years.

    Snow, a native of London, narrated that Lamave started with its founder Dr. Alessandro Ponzo from Italy, who has been studying cetaceans from all around the world. Stumbling through ...

  • What Do Mantas Eat? Our New Paper Reveals An Insight Into The Food Habits Mobulid Rays

    What Do Mantas Eat? Our New Paper Reveals An Insight Into The Food Habits Mobulid Rays

    We are delighted to announce a second publication this week: Trophic overlap in mobulid rays: insights from stable isotope analysis.

    Manta and devil rays are a group of closely related filter-feeders, which are threatened globally by bycatch and targeted fisheries. Their habitat use and feeding ecology are not well studied, and most efforts have focused on temporally limited stomach content analysis (See our last paper) or conclusions from tagging data.

    You are what you eat, and this is what the team investigates in this paper. By studying samples taken from individual rays' muscles the ...

  • Feeding The Worlds Largest Fish, Impact Of Provisioning On Whale Shark Presence And Migration

    Feeding The Worlds Largest Fish, Impact Of Provisioning On Whale Shark Presence And Migration

    A new paper from the Large Marine Vertebrates Research Institute Philippines and the Centre for Integrative Ecology of Deakin University in Australia describes the effect of provisioning (attracting wildlife with food to facilitate human interaction) on the presence and migratory behaviour of the whale shark in Oslob, Cebu, Philippines. The provisioning operation which was started in 2011 by local operators, has attracted over 200 whale sharks to the coastal waters of Oslob and with it hundreds of thousands of tourists every year. However, this has come at a great cost for the ecosystem and th ...