LAMAVE

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Physalus is a non-profit organization operating primarily for the protection of the environment through marine conservation initiatives. In 2010, Physalus started the Large Marine Vertebrates Project Philippines (LAMAVE) to conduct scientific research and raise environmental awareness in collaboration with government agencies, non-government organizations, universities and the private sector.

Large Marine Vertebrate Project Philippines LAMAVE News

  • Londoner Leads Marine-life Conservation For PHL Seas

    Londoner Leads Marine-life Conservation For PHL Seas

    It is quite ironic how a girl surnamed "Snow" can be found chasing sharks, whale sharks and rays in the tropical islands of the Philippines for a living.

    Sally J. Snow is the executive director of Lamave, one of the fastest-growing non-governmental organizations (NGOs), which have been successfully documenting the Philippines?s ocean wildlife specializing in large marine vertebrates for close to seven years.

    Snow, a native of London, narrated that Lamave started with its founder Dr. Alessandro Ponzo from Italy, who has been studying cetaceans from all around the world. Stumbling through ...

  • What Do Mantas Eat? Our New Paper Reveals An Insight Into The Food Habits Mobulid Rays

    What Do Mantas Eat? Our New Paper Reveals An Insight Into The Food Habits Mobulid Rays

    We are delighted to announce a second publication this week: Trophic overlap in mobulid rays: insights from stable isotope analysis.

    Manta and devil rays are a group of closely related filter-feeders, which are threatened globally by bycatch and targeted fisheries. Their habitat use and feeding ecology are not well studied, and most efforts have focused on temporally limited stomach content analysis (See our last paper) or conclusions from tagging data.

    You are what you eat, and this is what the team investigates in this paper. By studying samples taken from individual rays' muscles the ...

  • Feeding The Worlds Largest Fish, Impact Of Provisioning On Whale Shark Presence And Migration

    Feeding The Worlds Largest Fish, Impact Of Provisioning On Whale Shark Presence And Migration

    A new paper from the Large Marine Vertebrates Research Institute Philippines and the Centre for Integrative Ecology of Deakin University in Australia describes the effect of provisioning (attracting wildlife with food to facilitate human interaction) on the presence and migratory behaviour of the whale shark in Oslob, Cebu, Philippines. The provisioning operation which was started in 2011 by local operators, has attracted over 200 whale sharks to the coastal waters of Oslob and with it hundreds of thousands of tourists every year. However, this has come at a great cost for the ecosystem and th ...

  • Sustainability And Tourism How Can They Fit Together

    Sustainability And Tourism How Can They Fit Together

    Today we celebrate the International Day for Biological Diversity. This year CBD and its partners want to highlight the interdependence between biodiversity and sustainable tourism. When most people think about tourism, they often think of organized tours or crowded beaches. However, tourism can also contribute to creating a sustainable future.

    Migratory species such as birds, sharks, whales and dolphins can provide opportunities for sustainable tourism. Wildlife watching tours can raise environmental awareness without disturbing the animals or degrading their habitats. In order to avoid di ...

  • Volunteer Blog Nicky Allan

    Volunteer Blog Nicky Allan

    TURTLE LADY

    Although the BRUVS project is centered around elasmobranch research, we were all given side projects to work on individually. I was lucky enough to become the 'Turtle Lady', tasked with creating an ID catalogue of all the turtles around Apo Reef island and Pandan island, close to Sablayan. Pandan island is home to a well-known resort as well as many enormous resident green turtles. It has been the site of many relaxing days off from the project ??" a place to snorkel, dive, play pool and eat bruschetta. On each visit you can find yourself snorkeling with as many as 5 turtles at ...

  • Why Should We Care About Sharks

    Why Should We Care About Sharks

    Tagging" a big, gentle whale shark??"that is, swimming close enough to attach a device that will help scientists track the animal's movements??"seems easy enough for researchers. But tagging a tiger shark, known to be aggressive and strong enough to crunch a turtle in half, shell and all?

    Last year, in the second edition of "Expedition Shark" of the Tubbataha Management Office (TMO) and the Large Marine Vertebrates Research Institute Philippines (Lamave), the first study of its kind in the country, a tiger shark was tagged for the first time in the Coral Triangle.

    In April this year, the ...