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Inabanga News

  • Saving Meloy - Hambongan Islands RARE Pr

    Like Saving Nemo, the Disney film with a lovable clown fish – Meloy is the mascot of the Hambongan Island RARE Pride Campaign. He is a Phanter Grouper – a fish that belongs to a vulnerable group of species that lives in the local reefs. The fish are used for food and are popular with those who are aquarium hobbyists. As a result, the numbers of Phanter Grouper have gone down dramatically.

    Meloy was chosen because he is a signature fish of the region and I have to admit, for a fish, he is very cute. Since 1997, Inabanga has been working with fish wardens, coastal police, and barangay tan ...

  • Conservation Project To Save Seahorses

    Nights spell danger for the tiny seahorse, the colourful but naive denizen of the Philippines’ coral reefs.

    Here on the southern edge of Danajon Bank in Handumon, Philippines, fishermen dragging tiny boats lit with gas-fed lamps wade through the mangrove-shrouded coast into the shallows, hunting for the exotic fish whose camouflage is easily exposed by the light.

    The lantern boats are the basic infrastructure of a multi-billion-dollar global trade in seahorses, which end up in curio shops or aquariums across Europe and North America.

    But most are dried and powdered as an organic Via ...

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  • Saving The Seahorse From The Pet Shop An

    Nights spell danger for the tiny seahorse, the colorful but naive denizen of the Philippines' coral reefs.

    Here on the southern edge of Danajon Bank, fishermen dragging tiny boats lit with gas-fed lamps wade through the mangrove-shrouded coast into the shallows hunting for the exotic fish whose camouflage is easily exposed by the light.

    The lantern boats are the basic infrastructure of a multi-billion-dollar global trade in seahorses, which end up in curio shops or aquariums across Europe and North America.

    But most are dried and powdered as an organic Viagra or impotence cure for the ...

    • A
  • Saving Seahorses

    Biology professor Amanda Vincent finds herself in pretty exclusive company these days. The world's top seahorse expert, Vincent has just been named one of five winners of the Rolex Awards for Enterprise, a coveted prize that carries with it a cash award of $50,000 U.S.

    Established in 1976 by the company famous for its very expensive watches (part of Vincent's award is a gold Rolex chronometer), the prizes are presented every three years to individuals "seeking to break new ground in areas that advance human knowledge and well-being."

    The other Rolex Laureates, all of them either scientis ...

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